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Vegetarian Foods

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Protein Rich Vegetarian Foods For Summer

Protein is an essential nutrient to the body and most people consume protein through dairy products and meat. Although they are good sources, they come with certain side effects such as increase in body weight, cholesterol and body heat during summer. On Dieting Right we will see some protein rich vegetarian foods you can have for the summer.

Vegetarianism

250px-Soy-whey-protein-dietDescription: A vegetarian diet is derived from plants, with or without eggs or dairy. Varieties: Ovo, Lacto, Ovo-lacto, Veganism, Raw veganism, Fruitarianism, Hindu vegetarianism, Buddhist vegetarianism, Jain vegetarianism

Vegetarianism /ˈvɛdʒətɛəriənɪzəm/ is the practice of abstaining from the consumption of meat (red meat, poultry, seafood, insects and the flesh of any other animal), and may also include abstention from by-products of animal slaughter.

Vegetarianism can be adopted for different reasons. Many object to eating meat out of respect for sentient life. Such ethical motivations have been codified under various religious beliefs, along with animal rights. Other motivations for vegetarianism are health-related, political, environmental, cultural, aesthetic, economic, or personal preference. There are varieties of the diet as well: an ovo-vegetarian diet includes eggs but not dairy products, a lacto-vegetarian diet includes dairy products but not eggs, and an ovo-lacto vegetarian diet includes both eggs and dairy products. A vegan diet excludes all animal products, including eggs, dairy, beeswax and honey. Some vegans also avoid animal products such as leather (and possibly silk) for clothing and goose-fat for shoe polish.

250px-Vegan_Gardein_Tofu_Foods_Display_(cropped1)A variety of vegan and vegetarian deli foods.

Various packaged or processed foods, including cake, cookies, candies, chocolate, yogurt and marshmallows, often contain unfamiliar animal ingredients, and may be a special concern for vegetarians due to the likelihood of such additions. Often, products are reviewed by vegetarians for animal-derived ingredients prior to purchase or consumption. Vegetarians vary in their feelings regarding these ingredients, however. For example, while some vegetarians may be unaware of animal-derived rennet’s role in the usual production of cheese and may therefore unknowingly consume the product, other vegetarians may not take issue with its consumption.

Semi-vegetarian diets consist largely of vegetarian foods, but may include fish or poultry, or sometimes other meats, on an infrequent basis. Those with diets containing fish or poultry may define meat only as mammalian flesh and may identify with vegetarianism. A pescetarian diet has been described as “fish but no other meat.” The common use association between such diets and vegetarianism has led vegetarian groups such as the Vegetarian Society to state that diets containing these ingredients are not vegetarian, because fish and birds are also animals.

Etymology

The word vegetarian has been in use since 1839, referring to what was previously described as “vegetable diet”. It is commonly believed to be a compound of vegetable and the suffix -arian (as in agrarian). (John Davis shows that it was probably not derived from the Latin word vegetus. The term was popularised with the foundation of the Vegetarian Society in Manchester, UK in 1847. The earliest occurrences of the term seem to be related to Alcott House, a school on the north side of Ham Common, London, opened in July 1838 by James Pierrepont Greaves. From 1841, it was known as A Concordium, or Industry Harmony College, from which time the institution began to publish its own pamphlet, “The Healthian”, which provides some of the earliest occurrences of the term “vegetarian.”

History of Vegetarianism

220px-Karnataka_Lunch_at_GundlupetVegetarian Lunch at Mysore, India

The earliest record of vegetarianism comes from Indus Valley Civilization as early as the 7th century BCE, inculcating tolerance towards all living beings.

Vegetarianism was also practiced around 7 centuries later in another instance (between 30 BC–50 AD) in northern Thracian region, the Moesi tribe who inhabited present day Serbia and Bulgaria, feeding themselves on honey, milk and cheese.

In the Indian culture the diet was closely connected with the idea of nonviolence towards animals (called ahimsa in India) and was promoted by religious groups and philosophers.[22] Among the Hellenes, Egyptians and others, it had medical or Ritual purification purposes.

Indian emperor Ashoka asserted protection to fauna:

“Twenty-six years after my coronation various animals were declared to be protected – parrots, mainas, aruna, ruddy geese, wild ducks, nandimukhas, gelatas, bats, queen ants, terrapins, boneless fish, vedareyaka, gangapuputaka, sankiya fish, tortoises, porcupines, squirrels, deer, bulls, okapinda, wild asses, wild pigeons, domestic pigeons and all four-footed creatures that are neither useful nor edible. Those nanny goats, ewes and sows which are with young or giving milk to their young are protected, and so are young ones less than six months old. Cocks are not to be caponized, husks hiding living beings are not to be burnt and forests are not to be burnt either without reason or to kill creatures. One animal is not to be fed to another.” —Edicts of Ashoka, Fifth Pillar

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https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Vegetarianism

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