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This Day in History

Malcolm_X_March_26_1964_cropped_retouched 3

Malcolm X

On This Day in History February 2019

February
February 1 In 1960, four black college students began a sit-in protest at a lunch counter in Greensboro, N.C., where they’d been refused service.
February 2 In 1943, the remainder of Nazi forces from the Battle of Stalingrad surrendered in a major victory for the Soviets in World War II.
February 3 In 1917, the United States broke off diplomatic relations with Germany, which had announced a policy of unrestricted submarine warfare.
February 4 In 1974, newspaper heiress Patricia Hearst was kidnapped in Berkeley, Calif., by the Symbionese Liberation Army.
February 5 In 1937, President Roosevelt proposed increasing the number of Supreme Court justices; critics charged Roosevelt was attempting to “pack” the court.
February 6 In 1952, Britain’s King George VI died; he was succeeded by his daughter, Elizabeth II.
February 7 In 1964, the Beatles arrived in the United States for the first time, giving rise to Beatlemania.
February 8 In 1996, in a ceremony at the Library of Congress, President Clinton signed legislation revamping the telecommunications industry, saying it would “bring the future to our doorstep.”
February 9 In 1943, the World War II battle of Guadalcanal in the southwest Pacific ended with an American victory over Japanese forces.
February 10 In 1962, the Soviet Union exchanged captured American U-2 pilot Francis Gary Powers for Rudolph Ivanovich Abel, a Soviet spy held by the United States.
February 11 In 1945, President Roosevelt, British Prime Minister Winston Churchill and Soviet leader Josef Stalin signed the Yalta Agreement during World War II.
February 12 In 1999, the Senate acquitted President Bill Clinton on two articles of impeachment, falling short of a majority vote on either of the charges against him: perjury and obstruction of justice.
February 13 In 1935, a jury in Flemington, N.J., found Bruno Richard Hauptmann guilty of first-degree murder in the kidnap-death of the infant son of Charles and Anne Lindbergh. Hauptmann was later executed.
February 14 In 1929, the St. Valentine’s Day Massacre took place in a Chicago garage as seven rivals of Al Capone’s gang were gunned down.
February 15 In 1898, the U.S. battleship Maine blew up in Havana Harbor, killing 260 crew members and escalating tensions with Spain.
February 16 In 1923, the burial chamber of King Tutankhamen’s recently unearthed tomb was unsealed in Egypt.
February 17 In 1972, President Nixon departed on his historic trip to China.
February 18 In 1861, Jefferson Davis was sworn in as president of the Confederate States of America in Montgomery, Ala.
February 19 In 1945, during World War II, some 30,000 United States Marines landed on the Western Pacific island of Iwo Jima, where they encountered ferocious resistance from Japanese forces. The Americans took control of the strategically important island after a month-long battle.
February 20 In 1962, astronaut John Glenn became the first American to orbit Earth as he flew aboard the Friendship 7 Mercury capsule.
February 21 In 1965, former Black Muslim leader Malcolm X was shot and killed by assassins identified as Black Muslims as he was about to address a rally in New York City; he was 39.
February 22 In 1980, in a stunning upset, the United States Olympic hockey team defeated the Soviets at Lake Placid, N.Y., 4-to-3. (The U.S. team went on to win the gold medal.)
February 23 In 1954, the first mass inoculation of children against polio with the Salk vaccine began in Pittsburgh.
February 24 In 1868, the United States House of Representatives impeached President Johnson following his attempted dismissal of Secretary of War Edwin M. Stanton; Johnson was later acquitted by the Senate.
February 25 In 1870, Hiram R. Revels, R-Miss., became the first black member of the United States Senate as he was sworn in to serve out the unexpired term of Jefferson Davis.
February 26 In 1993, a bomb exploded in the garage of New York’s World Trade Center, killing six people and injuring more than 1,000 others.
February 27 In 1991, President Bush declared that “Kuwait is liberated, Iraq’s army is defeated,” and announced that the allies would suspend combat operations at midnight.
February 28 In 1993, a gun battle erupted near Waco, Texas, when Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco and Firearms agents tried to serve warrants on the Branch Davidians; four agents and six Davidians were killed as a 51-day standoff began.
February 29 In 1968, President Johnson’s National Advisory Commission on Civil Disorders (also known as the Kerner Commission) warned that racism was causing America to move “toward two societies, one black, one white — separate and unequal.”

http://learning.blogs.nytimes.com/on-this-day/

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