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New Brunswick, NJ

New Brunswick, New Jersey - New York Area's_1

Click to view: Silversmith: Abraham Voorhees, Silver Spoons

Abraham Voorhees was a local silversmith who operated out of New Brunswick around 1840.

Click to view: Silversmith: Jacques W. Cortelyou, Silver Spoons

Jacques W. Cortelyou (1781-1822) was a local silversmith who operated out of New Brunswick around 1805.

Click to view: Delaware and Raritan Canal (c. 1920)

The Delaware and Raritan (D&R) Canal, as it looked just over the border, past Landing Lane in New Brunswick, NJ.

Click to view: Hall-Mills Murders: New York Daily News Headlines (1926)

New York Daily News headlines, December 4, 1926. Not guilty!

Click to view: Hall-Mills Murders: Henry de la Bruyere Carpender, Obituary (1934)

Henry de la Bruyere Carpender, almost certainly falsely accused in the Hall-Mills Murders case, died just 8 years after the trial on May 26, 1934. Although he successfully had himself removed from the initial trial, he was never as healthy after the ….

Click to view: Hall-Mills Murders: George D. Totten, Detective/Reproter (1926)

George D. Totten was the Somerset County detective in charge of the initial 1922 Hall-Mills investigation. In 1926, Totten joined the staff of the New York Mirror.

Click to view: Laird Family Portrait (c. 1921)

Portrait of the Laird Family taken in Imlaystown, NJ. The Lairds operated the blacksmith shop and later store at the corner of South Middlebush and Suydam Roads (Laird Corner) in Pleasant Plains for well over 100 years, beginning before 1880. ….

Click to view: Map: Birdseye View of New Brunswick, NJ (1880)

Birdseye View map of of New Brunswick, NJ in 1880. Modern day Somerset would grow-up in the background of the right-side of the map

Click to view: Hall-Mills Murders: The Hall House in New Brunswick (1998)

This mansion at 23 Nichol Avenue in New Brunswick was occupied by Rev. Edward Wheeler Hall, Frances Noel Stevens Hall, and Willie Stevens. The house later became the home of the Dean of Douglass College at Rutgers University.

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