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Justice or Else: 10.10.15

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Justice Or Else, 2015 Million Man March: Louis Farrakhan explains The Way Forward 

2015 Million Man March: Louis Farrakhan explains The Way Forward and black christmas.

Hundreds rally at Metropolitan AME Church for “Justice or Else”

Honorable Minister Louis Farrakhan 2015 http://www.noi.org. Farrakhan is a black religious and social leader. Farrakhan has been both praised and widely criticized for his often controversial political views and outspoken rhetorical style. He has been criticized for remarks that have been perceived as antisemitic, anti-white and prejudiced against gays. In October 1995, he organized and led the Million Man March in Washington, D.C., calling on black men to renew their commitments to their families and communities. Farrakhan, due to health issues, reduced his responsibilities with the NOI in 2007. The Nation of Islam under the leadership of the Honorable Minister Louis Farrakhan is the catalyst for the growth and development of Islam in America. Founded in 1930 by Master Fard Muhammad and led to prominence from 1934 to 1975 by the Honorable Elijah Muhammad, the Nation of Islam continues to positively impact the quality of life in Black America.

logo_2xWASHINGTON (WJLA) – With the theme “Justice or Else,” hundreds of supporters of Nation of Islam Minister Louis Farrakhan, and others rallied at Metropolitan AME Church in downtown Washington, D.C. Wednesday afternoon.

The reason for Farrakhan’s appearance was to announce his 20th anniversary “Million Man March” to be held in October.

A big focus of his speech today was about the murders last week of the nine black church members at Charleston, South Carolina’s Emanuel AME Church.

Farrakhan used the words “snake” and “skunk,” to describe the Charleston shooter, Dylan Roof.

Today’s rally came days after a racially mixed crowd packed into the same Metropolitan AME Church last Friday to mourn the deaths in Charleston.

The members in today’s crowd belong, predominately, to the Nation of Islam, and were there to greet their leader.

“Its black lives that are being slaughtered,” Farrakhan told the crowd.”We know what justice is: it’s fair dealing; it’s the law that distinguishes between right and wrong.”

Farrakhan announced his march will take place on October 10, 2015. The Reverend Willie Wilson, of DC’s Union Temple Baptist Church, who helped organize the 1995 March, said this one will be different.

“It’s not about just black men,” Wilson said, “But black men, women children, Latinos, Asians, and Caucasians.”

logo_2x-300x108Million Man March Million Man March Louis Farrakhan, Washington, D.C. Rally Justice or Else 2015 Nation of Islam Farrakhan. 20 years ago, 1 million African American men came in herds, by any means necessary, to attend the first annual Million Man March. Speakers like the late Dr. Maya Angelou, Minister Louis Farrakhan and many others gave hope to men who struggle with the everyday life of violence, drugs and disappointment in their lives. The march was also intended to uplift African American men, and inspire them to do better by their families, communities and most importantly, themselves.

Today, October 10th, Louis Farrakhan is summoning 1 million men to march to Washington, D.C. to celebrate the 20th anniversary of this momentous occasion. At the time of the march, Black men dealt with a lot of hardships, ranging from a society still very much influence by the Jim Crow south and the post-slavery prejudice that ran rampant in the early 20th century. Now, fast forward to 2015, and Black on Black crime is at an all time high, and police killings are happening at a record pace around the country. The question is, will this march open the eyes of the nation, especially those of its Black men? Time to open our eyes and ears and pay attention to what’s happening right in front of them.

http://www.wjla.com/articles/2015/06/hundreds-rally-at-metropolitan-ame-church-for-justice-or-else–115022.html

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